Remember that time Tim and Eric accidentally clothed the homeless in Austin?

Comedy duo Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim are celebrating ten years performing together with the  Tim & Eric Ten Year Anniversary Awesome Tour. The tour hits Austin on July 28 for a show at the Paramount.

A few years back, we celebrated the tenth anniversary of Fun Fun Fun Fest, the event’s final go round with its original producers before Graham Williams and much of his crew broke off and started Sound on Sound Fest. To mark the occasion we complied a comprehensive oral history of the fest.

RELATED: Ten years of triple Fun: An oral history of Fun Fun Fun Fest

Folded into the tales of battles with the city, rock star divas and French onion soup, was this little gem about from 2008. At the time, FFF Fest was a rag tag event produced on a shoestring budget in Waterloo Park. Producer Graham Williams felt bad about his event displacing the homeless people who made the park their year round residence, so he hired some of them to work as his grounds crew.

It was the first year the festival included comedy and they were excited to welcome the Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job. And then this happened.

Max Gregor: (Tim and Eric) were awesome but also kind of a disaster. There was a box of their merch that was delivered to festival grounds and somehow it was dropped off literally in the middle of the park. Just a box sitting on the ground … while we were building. It was kind of like 60 feet away from the stairs that led up to the merch area so I think people that saw it were like, “Oh that’s somebody who’s setting up merch.” For a couple days it sat there.
So finally we opened up the doors for the festival and people came through and a few hours later Tim and Eric show up and they’re like, “Hey, it’s kind of crazy but there’s just tons of people wearing our merch everywhere. Have you been selling a lot?” And we were like, “Your merch?”
Rosa Madriz: All the homeless folks. They left it out … and everyone who was helping clean the park was wearing all their merch around the park.
Max Gregor: Tim Heidecker was standing there as I was having this conversation with his manager being like, “Yeah it all must have gotten stolen and it was our fault,” and the manager trying to be super cool about it … with the artist just standing there silently. Just staring at me. Like what a (expletive) idiot.
Later Adi Anand, who then worked at now-defunt website the Austinist, interviewed Tim and Eric in a swank little lounge area set up by Prototype Vintage.
Adi Anand (Director of client services): (They) got super fired up in their characters and one of the Prototype chairs was flipped over into the creek behind the (lounge). I had to go down and like bargain with some of the folks who lived in the park who claimed that to be their new furniture.

 

Breaking: Dave Chappelle’s Juke Joint popping up tonight in Willie Nelson’s Luck, Texas

By Matthew Odam

Dave Chappelle has not only been slaying comedian fans of late, he’s been throwing some damn good parties, as well. His Juke Joint parties have been hits in his home state of Ohio and outside of New Orleans over NBA All-Star Weekend. The comedian announced he will be throwing one tonight at 9 p.m. in Luck, Texas. Expect live music (including Frédéric Yonnet), laughs and a goood time. Also: NO PHONES OR CAMERAS. Seriously. Tickets are $85 and a limited number are on sale to the general public.  The party pops off after Chappelle’s final show at ACL Live, with buses to Spicewood available for Juke Joint ticket holders.

If the party is half as good the show we saw Wednesday night, expect a good time.

Dave Chappelle kills at ACL Live; jokes he was wrong to hold out hope for Donald Trump

By Matthew Odam

Nevermind what you feared, Dave Chappelle is back and on top of his game.

In this Jan. 21, 2008 file photo, comedian Dave Chappelle attends a Democratic presidential debate sponsored by CNN and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute in Myrtle Beach, S.C. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

When his two Netflix specials dropped recently, some worried Chappelle might not be keeping up with the times. There were tone-deaf jokes about the transgender community and rape. Those subjects aren’t off-limits in stand-up comedy, but Chappelle’s jokes weren’t worthy of the triggering. They didn’t enlighten or enliven the societal conversation. Referencing a line Chappelle told Gayle King on “CBS This Morning” recently, they didn’t highlight an “irreconcilable moment of paradox.”

With those imperfect advertisements, some may have been skeptical about Chappelle’s form. But those sets were almost two years old (the Austin shows edited into episode two were from April 2015). Chappelle proved at his Wednesday night late show, amidst a sold-out weeklong run at ACL Live, that he’s  as sharp as ever.

He didn’t walk close to the fire from his Netflix specials, instead rallying the crowd from the moment he took the stage. Chappelle proved he is a uniter, not a divider.  And nothing brings us together quite like comedy.

Maybe it was simply a nod to the West, but Chappelle seemed aware of the ripples created by his recent specials and the bullseye-on-your-back role of comedian in world of social media and instant reaction, taking the stage in a black cowboy hat to Bon Jovi’s “Wanted: Dead or Alive,” following a fire set from opener Donnell Rawlings. (We sadly missed former Austinite Ashley Barnhill.)

His jokes weren’t uncomfortable but he didn’t play it safe,  as the self-proclaimed feminist proved with a self-aware bit about  how the feminist movement needed a man in charge, a joke that required a deft touch and a strong sense of absurdist vulnerability

Chappelle made news earlier this year with his great “Saturday Night Live” monologue, which aggravated and moved people with his call to give Donald Trump a chance. But, Chappellehas pumped his breaks on that one. The living legend said he had made a mistake with that plea. Trump has fallen apart and can’t do anything right, Chappelle said to raucous and relieved consensus.

The comedian suffered a train-wreck of fan interference when he visited the Paramount in 2012, when he was just starting to take swings on big stages again, but he rolled with the few interruptions and created a few of his own Wednesday night, embracing fans, not alienating or shaming them. He delivered watermelon juice to one audience member for her cocktail and sent another couple tequila shots. The relationship between performer and audience was made tighter by the lack of cell phones. On entering, attendees had to put their phones in sealed pouches that were unlocked on exiting, an awesome touch that meant no glowing phones, no selfies, no shots of Chappelle, and, the main reason, no recording. It was a touch that gave the night a retro feel, tripping back to when community was less disrupted and more organic. I would love to see the policy at every concert, movie and performing arts show.

Phones or no, Chappelle would have had the audience rapt all night, however, as he moved from easy but hilarious jokes about Bill Cosby’s “shenanigans” to more poignant societal statements about the late Emmett Till, the latter proving that not only is Chappelle back on top, he is exactly the comedian America needs in these uneasy times.